GitHub is getting easier

Today, GitHub announced that you can move and rename files within your repositories actually at their website, rather than by making the changes locally, committing and then pushing them. I confess that I didn’t even know, until today, that you could create and edit files in the first place on the GitHub website, I’ve just been using it as a freetard’s on-line repository – commit, push and forgeddaboutit.

I think this changes the game both for the user and for GitHub itself. Normally, one would create and edit files locally, commit them to the local git repository, and then push the changes up to GitHub (or any on-line git repository such as those hosted by SourceForge or BitBucket). Such is this work-flow so natural that I rarely ever visit the GItHub web-site, except when I need to create a new, blank, repository. Now a novice user can very easily create and initialise a new Git repository, create and edit files, rename and move them, create branches, fork and merge – all without so much as a nod to a command line or a Git client. So the dirty mechanics of Git recede into the background and what we have is an easy to use web interface/client to create and manage versions of files, and with a social sharing aspect, to boot.

GitHub is therefore de-emphasising the difficult and opaque “Git” aspect and increasing its “Hub-ness”. I think this potentially increases the user base and positions it for services and features that are not necessarily tied to just geeky and boring Source Control Management. It’s not that Git is getting sexy, but that file version control and repository forking is getting easier. It also means that users might spend more time at the GitHub web-site rather than in their Git client or IDE. Ads next, maybe?

I propose a new word:

giterate
adjective
able to use Git literately.

As in, “Hey, Steve’s getting quite giterate these days!”

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